Jessamyn's Regency Costume Companion: Men's Patterns

~ Mens' Waistcoat & Breeches Patterns ~

A rundown of the patterns available for men's Regency waistcoats, breeches, & pantaloons.


Waistcoat Patterns.


Olde Country Costumes' Men's Vests. Old Country Costumes specializes in traditional Nordic costumes, which appear to have fossilized right around the Regency--especially for men's dress.

Price: About $11.

What You Get: Patterns for various waistcoats, good for 1800 through 1820.
  • Pattern for a straight-bottomed, single-breasted waistcoat with standup collar.
  • Pattern for a straight-bottomed, double-breasted waistcoat with standup collar.
  • Patterns for two non-Regency waistcoat styles.
  • Two pocket variations.
  • Multisized men's 38-48.

What's Good
  • Nice range of styles for the price.
  • Good for a twenty-year period; flap pockets are better for the earliest years.
  • With a simple extension of the front, could be used for 1790s; open-collar style could be used for 1820s.

Caveats
  • I have no experience with this one.

Bottom Line: Recommended. Seems to be appropriate for Regency, and the flexibility of style is nice.


Rocking Horse Farm's pattern envelope.


Waistcoat I believe made from this pattern by Jas. Townsend & Sons.

Rocking Horse Farm Men's 1812 Waistcoat pattern. Standard waistcoat for the Regency.

Price: About $10.

What You Get: Pattern for a Regency waistcoat, good for 1800 through 1820.
  • Pattern for a straight-bottomed, single-breasted waistcoat with standup collar.
  • Multisized M-L-XL.

What's Good
  • An extremely typical Regency garment; looks appropriate.
  • Despite the year in the pattern title, it's good for a twenty-year period.

Caveats
  • Rocking Horse Farm patterns don't always work well, and I have no experience with this one.
  • No size small!

Bottom Line: Moderately recommended. Seems to be appropriate for a broad range of years, and shouldn't be too hard to make.



Eagle's View Men's Waistcoat and Vest pattern. Purports to be late 18th and early 19th century, but in fact jumps straight over the Regency to the Romantic period.

Bottom Line: Skip it!



Breeches and Trouser Patterns.


The Eagle's View pattern envelope.


Broadfall breeches made from this pattern by Jas. Townsend & Sons.

Eagle's View Men's Broadfall Drop Front Breeches & Pants pattern. Standard breeches and pants for the Regency man.

Price: About $8.

What You Get: Pattern for fall-front breeches or pants.
  • Pattern for fall-front, gathered-back knee-breeches that button, buckle, or tie just below knee.
  • Pattern for fall-front, gathered-back trousers.
  • Both styles adjust with lacing at back waistband.
  • Both styles have full, gathered backs for ease of movement.
  • Multisized waist 30-42.

What's Good
  • I've seen these made up and they look good.
  • Includes instructions on working with leather!
  • Knee breeches are good for 18th century through 1810s for day wear--up through 1820s for formal wear, and day wear for conservative older gentlemen.
  • Trousers are good for 1810 on for day wear (not including riding).

Caveats
  • Gathered back may look funny to the modern eye, but as you'll never remove your coat in company, it doesn't matter; be glad of the freedom of movement!

Bottom Line: Recommended. Seems to be appropriate for a broad range of years, and shouldn't be too hard to make.



Olde Country Costumes' Men's Combo. Old Country Costumes produces this traditional Nordic combination.

Price: About $11.

What You Get: Pattern for fall-front breeches (referred to as "knickers" on the pattern envelope).
  • Pattern for fall-front, slim-fit back knee-breeches that tie just below knee.
  • Pattern for stand-collar shirt.
  • Multisized 38-48 (waist 32-42).

What's Good
  • You get knee-breeches and a stand-collar shirt for one (good) price.
  • Closer-fitting back is less period-appropriate, but some men may prefer it anyway (and again, it shouldn't show, because you shouldn't take your coat off!).
  • Knee breeches are good for 18th century through 1810s for day wear--up through 1820s for formal wear.

Caveats
  • Fitted backside isn't really period-appropriate.
  • Breeches appear to gather into knee-band, but stylish Regency breeches should taper instead.

Bottom Line: Okay if you want a cheap two-fer pattern that's fairly simple to make and aren't obsessed with total historical accuracy.



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